Smaller Funders (ACF Member Network)

Issue:
Grant-making practices
 • 
Location:
UK-wide
Type:
Existing collaboration

Aims and activities

Aims and questions

ACF networks provide members with an opportunity to connect with each other, discuss a variety of topics and share best practice and learning.

The Smaller funders network is for 'soloists' (individuals that administer one or more trusts of any size on their own) and for trusts and foundations giving less than £500,000 a year. This network may also be relevant to larger foundations with limited staff capacity or very restricted areas of funding.

This network is to provide an opportunity to meet with peers to compare experiences and explore the issues with others addressing the same questions in organisations of similar size.

We are very pleased that ACF has recognised that the majority of the foundation sector are ‘smaller’ grant-making charities and have developed a resource specifically for them. Especially one that celebrates the pioneering approaches by some smaller funders, as well as guiding all towards ambitious practice.

Hazel Capper, St Giles & St George, and Johanna Tompsett, SYP Trust
Co-convenors of ACF’s Smaller funders network

How to get involved

Staff and trustees of ACF members can access the network here to find further details and subscribe to receive updates. (Please note: you will need to be logged in as an ACF member.)

Information about ACF membership can be found here.

Who's involved

Contact details for the network convenor and a list of subscribers to the network are available to logged-in members on the ACF website.

Learning and Resources

The Smaller Funders network contributed to ACF's report, as part of its Stronger Foundations series, looking at how smaller foundations can pursue ambitious and effective practice. This found that while smaller foundations may be constrained by limited resource, capacity and time, they can have a structural advantage in pursuing ambitious and effective practice and achieving impact in pursuit of their mission. Read the report here.

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